literary
Book Review: Life of a Bengali refugee in Norway

By: IBNS

Book Review: Life of a Bengali refugee in Norway
Power Publishers released its new title 'Norway te Ek Bangali Shoronarthir Jiboner Obhighhota', a non-fiction novel by author Kumar Ghosh that talks about the life of a Bengali refugee in Norway.

This is the author's second book after the grand success of his debut book "Pochish Takay Bishwa Bhromoner Pothe" which too was a real-life account of his peace-mission around the world in a cycle. 
 
"Norway te.." has been written from a first person point of view and in Bengali. 
 
Sukumar Sarkar is the protagonist of the book. He is a farmer and astrologer from India who becomes a refugee and escapes to Norway. The plot of the story is based in Norway itself. 
 
In an intense conversation with a lady named Linda, he reveals the flaws of the Indian  government and the problems he had to face for the loop holes that is there in the Indian judiciary. 
 
The narration then continues to tell the story of his adventure in this whole new life of him in a completely different place where he is a stranger and everything around him comes with a tinge of unfamiliarity in it. 
        
While reading the story we get to visit Norway and see it from the eyes of the author. We get a taste of how it is like to live a life as a refugee. We also get a closer look into the government of India and all loopholes that it has, the corruption, the thirst for power which is never quenched, the loyalty of the judiciary system towards the ruling party for promotions and payments. 
 
We are all aware of corruption, but seeing it that closely and candidly in a book is what makes it so ugly and disgusting. 
 
The events in the story have been woven together very nicely, the connection between different events and one event triggering the other one has also been very aptly given and used in the story. 
 
From the very beginning of the book, the author has given out information very cleverly. From the very starting, the reader starts gathering questions and the writer has left hints here and there which give the answers to the question. 
 
The author has successfully grasped the attention of the reader throughout the book, keeping it short and very compact. 
 
The book is undoubtedly a good read. What really makes it interesting is that is a true-to-the-skin biographical account narrated by a Bengali man. Hence, the simplicity resonates from all corners of the pages. 
 
Overall, I'd like to rate the book 8 out of 10. Priced at Rs 270, the book will shortly be available in all popular online stores and also at the Kolkata Book Fair.
 
Reviewed by Soumashree Mukherjee