literary
Book review: Author Nirbhay Singh on why he doesn't need to travel to a developing country
IBNS | 05 Jun 2018
Book review: Author Nirbhay Singh on why he doesn't need to travel to a developing country
Nirbhay Singh’s 'Why I Don’t need to Travel to a Developing Country', from Power Publishers, echoes the same philosophy as does a bildungsroman, tracing the physical and psychological growth of the author in his own words, as he travels from India to Canada.

His birth and early years in the remote Indian village of Changla, had him acquainted, from the very beginning to the hardships and impoverishment of a village life in a developing country. 
 
Although lucky to have been born in a privileged family, the author consistently felt the lack of education around him. a theme that reverberates through the book. 
 
He realised that education was the basic instrument that propel Changla and India on the path of development. 
 
The author, once he travels to Canada, realises that problems ailing India include lack of technology, lack of open mindedness and most importantly rampant corruption eating into the core of the political structure. 
 
Born in a family of brave and accomplished men, the author thus takes up the challenge to bring the revolution himself. 
 
As the title suggests, while he does not feel the need to travel to a different developing country for his roots are tied to India, he feels that his educative trip to Canada was essential for his enlightenment. 
 
What he learns there, is thus what he passes on.
 
Substantiated with real life experiences at every step, the book is a light read with a strong message and is true for all-irrespective of time and society. 
 
The unconventional genre, the lucid style of storytelling and yet the didacticism makes the book a unique therapy for conventional mindsets and is a must read for all with a progressive mental make-up eager to rectify and see India grow. 
 
Priced at Rs 250/-, the book is currently available in amazon.comflipkart.com and power-publishers.com
 

(Reviewed by Arjama Aich)